3 Resources Close To Home

colored pastels 2It starts in high school, or even middle school; that panicky feeling parents get as they consider their teen’s future. What college will my child attend? What will she study? What type of career can it lead to? And – here’s where the panic kicks in – how do I help him find the right place?

When my kids were beginning high school I felt like I needed to know all the answers to these questions, and more. Truth-be-told, I didn’t know where to start, and didn’t know which questions would help move me forward instead of just adding to the panic.

With that in mind, here are three places you can begin your own research. They’re simple, easily accessible, and right under your nose.

1. High School Counselor

These tireless advisors are true advocates for your children. Given the responsibility of guiding students through high school, they offer the ultimate in academic, personal, and developmental support. Traditionally they work with each student for four years, which gives them the chance to truly know your child and help with the transition to college. They’ll offer specific college suggestions based on your child’s strengths and interests, provide advice on grade point averages and standardized tests, and assist with the quagmire that is today’s application process.

2. High School Art Teacher

Your high school art teachers are tour guides for your child’s artistic exploration. They introduce students to the basic principles of art and design, and expand their comprehension of the subject by engaging students with a diverse variety of artistic styles, artists, and media. As up close observers they’ll assess your child’s artistic skills, guide for strengths, and make suggestions in the form of medium, career, and even school choices.

3. Neighbors

If you have children in high school then I’m guessing you have friends or neighbors with college age children as well. Although they haven’t walked in your exact shoes, they’ve been down this road before and should be a wealth of information. They can make recommendations based their own experiences and offer up personal tidbits that you might not have heard of otherwise. Most importantly – for that panicky feeling – they’ve survived the process, and lived to talk about it.

As a parent, you’re the one with the front row seat to your child’s artistic strengths and passions. If you want to know how you can guide them to the best college fit, start talking. Even asking “where do I begin?” or “how did you begin?” will get you going. After you’ve started these conversations I’d suggest you start checking out some colleges, but we can talk about that next week.

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Benefits Of A Summer Program

Ringling College of Art & Design

Ringling College of Art & Design

I’d like to tell you that spring is in the air, but honestly I’m just not feeling it. Snow is all around and there isn’t a crocus or daffodil in sight. But spring and even summer should be on your mind because now is the time to plan for a pre-college art or design summer program.

During June, July and August, large and small colleges across the country offer one – to – six week opportunities for high school students to become immersed in a creative collegiate experience.  Depending upon the institution, courses can range from life drawing or game design, to fashion, photography, and portfolio development.

The benefits are tremendous. Here’s your chance to learn from working artists while you gain new skills, find a new passion, and gain a clearer understanding of college-level work.  Grow as an artist while you work on your portfolio and live among like-minded artisans.

I’ve listed a few programs to jump-start your research. While doing your own exploration I hope you’ll keep these key points in mind:

  • On-campus living opportunities vary from program to program.
  • Some summer programs offer college credit.
  • Many programs have a minimum age requirement of 16.
  • Application, financial aid, and scholarship deadlines vary by institution.

Time spent in an intensive summer program will prove to be a worthwhile experience as you plan for your transition to college. I hope you take the time to research some options close to home, and a little further away. Let me know what you find, and where you end up.

Columbia College, Chicago, Illinois

Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle, Washington

Ringling College of Art & Design, Sarasota, Florida

University of Cincinnati, DAAP, Cincinnati, Ohio

University of Michigan, Stamps School of Art & Design, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Cooper-Union

Cooper-Union

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