3 Paths to an Art Degree

Oregon State University

Oregon State University

Want to help your artistic son or daughter find the best college fit? Two key decisions made early in the search process can lead to a simpler and less stressful college search. Help them figure out what type of degree they want to pursue and what type of environment suits them best. The two go hand-in-hand, and it’s easier than it sounds. Here are three paths you’ll need to consider:

 

1 – Art and design colleges provide the ultimate in immersion. Most of your son’s time will be spent studying the arts, just like all his peers. Living and breathing art and design, and preparing for a future in the field are the focus here: 24/7. This is study with commitment. Roughly two-thirds of your teen’s time will be focused on the arts. Math, science and humanities play supporting roles, with subject matter that informs the arts. A BFA is most common.

Kenyon College

2 – One-on-one attention is in the DNA at liberal arts colleges. The emphasis is on teaching strong foundational skills like writing, critical thinking, and communication. Classes are typically small, with lots of discussion and opportunity for professors to get to know their students. Approximately one-third of students’ study time will focus on the arts and most graduate with a BA. Students major in a variety of subjects.

3 – Amenities are the name of the game at large college campuses. You want it; chances are the university will offer it. Football games, fraternities and sororities, and an affiliation with every organization known to mankind come to mind. So do opportunities to study across fields and even create your own major; think design and engineering, or biology and art. Interdisciplinary studies create endless learning possibilities. And, once on campus, if your daughter decides design isn’t her thing, she’ll have a wealth of other majors to consider.

Maine College of Art

Maine College of Art

Getting clear about what your teen wants to study, and what type of environment will be best for them will get everyone off to a great start. Begin your family conversations early, and include a visit to each type of campus if you can.

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Searching for the Best College Fit

This past week I had the pleasure of participating in Bexley High School’s College Awareness Night, an event devoted to answering questions about college for teens and parents. During the evening, I led a wonderful discussion on the College Search Process for the Visual Arts. Our conversation focused on getting organized, identifying options and resources, and planning ahead for a successful search.

A few of the questions I answered included:

  • What are the differences between an arts college and a liberal arts college?
  • Can you explain what goes into a portfolio?
  • How do I determine which are the best art programs for my teen?

It was an energetic and engaging discussion.

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 8.02.49 AM

Where are you in your search process? Are you feeling like you don’t know where to begin? Are you confused and overwhelmed in the midst of your teen’s search? Are you trying to compare multiple creative programs, or perhaps trying to understand the portfolio process?

If you answer “yes” to any of the above, give me a call. I’ll help you understand what decisions need to be made, alleviate some of the stress of your search, and help your family develop a plan to find the best college fit for your teen.

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Scholarship Season: Tips & Tools

scholarship piggy banks from FastwebThis time of year usually creates a stress shift. Hearts and minds have moved beyond the holiday season and those time-consuming college applications have long been completed and submitted. Senior families are now consumed by “the waiting game;” that time when everyone becomes visibly sensitive to each ping, tweet, and swoosh emitted from cell phones and computers. Did she get in? Is he wait-listed? If you haven’t already done so, it’s a good time to research scholarship opportunities. The cost of higher education isn’t getting cheaper anytime soon, and once admission letters are in hand it might be too late to investigate many opportunities. So, if you haven’t already jumped into this pool, why not dive in now?

The suggestion to research scholarships often results in a deer-in-the-headlights stare from parents and teens alike. Translation: where do I begin? The biggest bang you’ll get will always be from institutions that accept your teen. That being said, there are countless other opportunities to explore. Keep in mind that many deadlines for submission have already passed. And some scholarships might seem small when you consider the overall cost of college. Try not to let this discourage you. Each one can help alleviate the expense of books, art supplies, dorm living, etc. Add multiple wins together and you could be talking some substantial money.

Before you begin a random search, consider a few tips to keep in mind:

Scholastic Art Scholarship  submittal 2014

Scholastic Art Scholarship submittal 2014

Know your resources. The best place to start is with your high school counselors. They can guide you to reputable online sites. Plus, they may be aware of some hidden gems that specifically speak to your search. I’d also reach out to local non-profits and your employer. Both may offer scholarships that you’re unaware of.

Know what you’re searching for. Will he be staying in state? Is she specifically interested in one major? Pay attention to categories that fit your teen. You can search by state, major, religious affiliation, community service, etc.

Read the fine print. Each application has its own unique requirements for submission and awards. Deadlines vary.

Don’t forget college admissions offices. If you’re pretty sure your teen will be accepted at a school – or already has been accepted – you should already be in communication with the admissions office about scholarship opportunities. That’s where you have the chance for the largest financial impact.

Many students feel mentally fatigued from the application process itself. I get that. Spending time searching for scholarships would seem even more draining. And, submitting another unique drawing or essay might feel like a waste of time and energy. I get that too. But your son or daughter won’t have any chance of winning those sought after funds if they don’t even try. That extra effort now may enable a semester for studying abroad or reduce the amount they’ll need to earn over the summer.

Here are a few opportunities to get you started. If you need additional help searching, send me an email and we can work together. I’m at artcollegelife@gmail.com.

Zinngia Art Scholarship (Ohio residents, applicable anywhere)

Two-Ten Footwear Foundation

Ladies Auxiliary VFW

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scholarship signage

 

ACL On The Road

puzzle-pieces -halfI’m taking Art.College.Life. on the road! Ok, I’m actually taking it to the library, but it’s a start, right?

On Wednesday, June 18th I’ll lead a discussion on finding the best fit in a visual arts program, The College Search Process For Art & Design Majors, at the Bexley Public Library at 7:00pm. Please join me, and tell your friends about it.

My goal for the evening is to guide local families through the puzzle known as the college admissions process. Our conversation will cover many of the topics I write about in the posts on Art.College.Life., gleaned from two years of discussions and meetings with college admissions personnel, and visual arts professors and students.

Here’s just a sampling of what we’ll cover:

  • Where’s the best place to begin the college search process?
  • How is the process different for visual art majors?
  • How important is your student’s portfolio?
  • What are your financial options?
  • What career opportunities are available for art and design majors?

Researching the vast number of quality visual arts programs, and narrowing down which are the best for your student can seem daunting and overwhelming. Join our conversation Wednesday night, and gain an understanding for a clearer way through the process.

I hope you can join us!

THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS FOR ART & DESIGN MAJORS

Wednesday, June 18
7:00 – 8:30 pm
Bexley Public Library
Bexley, OH

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4 Tour Tips Help You Choose The Right College

Campus tours are valuable during any part of your college search. For rising juniors or seniors they can help narrow down the type of institution you’re searching for, as well as where you want to be geographically. For graduating seniors they can become a window into your future.

Within the next few weeks high school seniors will know all of their college options. That means final decisions need to be made in a little over a month. The pressure is on. To break a tie between two favorites, or just for personal assurance, I’d suggest making one more quick campus visit. Whether you’ve toured before or not, aim to get the most out of the experience by personalizing your trip.

Campus visits typically include an information session and a campus tour. I’d suggest you spice it up a bit. Add some exploration time into your schedule and make sure you see the places you want to see. The benefit will be a more accurate feel for life on campus. Here are the best options:

1. Wander around campus. Get lost. Walk into buildings just to see what’s inside. Find areas that entice you. If Ceramics is your passion, then make sure you locate the clay studio. Don’t be shy to stop and engage a student or professor along the way. Asking for directions can lead to a tour of spaces you didn’t know existed and new insights.

MassArt cafeteria

MassArt cafeteria

2. Engage with students. Go to the cafeteria or student union and strike up a conversation. This is your chance to obtain impromptu and honest opinions of what people really like or dislike about the college.

3. Sit in on a class. Your admissions representative will be happy to set this up for you. It will give you a view into your life for the next four years.

4. Spend the night. Your admissions representative can set this up for you as well. Better yet, if you know someone on campus ask if they can put you up for a night. The idea here is to give you the opportunity to see what campus life is like beyond classes. You’ll experience dorm life, gain a better feel for time spent in the studio after hours, and get a first-hand take on the morning rush at the Cheerios counter.

SAIC dorm studio

SAIC dorm studio

If you come to campus with unanswered questions, now is the time to get them resolved. Need to meet with a financial aid rep? Do it now; face to face is always better. Want to get a clear picture of the surrounding community? Here’s your chance. Find out where the closest art supply store is located and check out the neighborhood.

By the time you’ve finished your visit, whether it was for three or twenty-four hours, you’ll have a much better grasp of this college experience, and the road that lies ahead for you.

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