@Pre-College: 8 Tips To Find The Best Summer Arts Program

Temple University, Tyler School of Art

Summer seems a long way off. Especially since the first real snow is just beginning to accumulate outside my window. Yet, even with snowflakes falling, this is the time to put a summer plan in motion for your artsy teen.

I realize that warm summer months are the perfect time for downtime. But getting into top college programs is competitive; a summer program can further your teen’s artistic skills and resume while simultaneously giving him a real taste for college life.

What should you and your teen look for as you search for the best college fit in a pre-college program? Here are just a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Syracuse University Senior Fashion Show: Lailee Waxman

    Syracuse University Senior Fashion Show: Lailee Waxman

    Programs vary in length between one – six weeks.

  • Some colleges limit their summer programs to rising juniors and seniors.
  • Many institutions will count pre-college courses towards college credit. But make sure to inquire even if your teen matriculates elsewhere; some courses are transferable.
  • Some colleges require campus residency over the summer while others don’t provide campus housing at all. The latter means living at home or finding another residence.
  • Most pre-college courses have spring deadlines. So don’t wait until the snow melts to do your research.
  • And speaking of deadlines, if you’re looking for a financial aid to help cover the costs, keep your eyes open to scholarship application deadlines. They often have different deadlines.
  • When totalling up your costs make sure to consider tuition, housing, meal plan, fees, and supplies. Supply costs vary by course.
  • Health and other campus services are typically available just like during fall – spring school terms. Residence hall and academic advisors are available as well. Recreation and other facilities are open.

Attendance at a specific summer program is no guarantee that your aspiring artist will be accepted in the fall. However, it will provide a substantial leg up by delivering a college-level challenge, building strengths and skills, contributing to a future portfolio, and providing the opportunity to connect with a professor – who could possibly write a reference letter when its application time.

I’ve listed a few great art and design programs to get your search started. Good luck! And let me know where you end up –

CCAD
RISD
SCAD
Syracuse University
Temple University (Tyler School of Art)

Find for more art.college.life. on facebook and twitter

3 Paths to an Art Degree

Oregon State University

Oregon State University

Want to help your artistic son or daughter find the best college fit? Two key decisions made early in the search process can lead to a simpler and less stressful college search. Help them figure out what type of degree they want to pursue and what type of environment suits them best. The two go hand-in-hand, and it’s easier than it sounds. Here are three paths you’ll need to consider:

 

1 – Art and design colleges provide the ultimate in immersion. Most of your son’s time will be spent studying the arts, just like all his peers. Living and breathing art and design, and preparing for a future in the field are the focus here: 24/7. This is study with commitment. Roughly two-thirds of your teen’s time will be focused on the arts. Math, science and humanities play supporting roles, with subject matter that informs the arts. A BFA is most common.

Kenyon College

2 – One-on-one attention is in the DNA at liberal arts colleges. The emphasis is on teaching strong foundational skills like writing, critical thinking, and communication. Classes are typically small, with lots of discussion and opportunity for professors to get to know their students. Approximately one-third of students’ study time will focus on the arts and most graduate with a BA. Students major in a variety of subjects.

3 – Amenities are the name of the game at large college campuses. You want it; chances are the university will offer it. Football games, fraternities and sororities, and an affiliation with every organization known to mankind come to mind. So do opportunities to study across fields and even create your own major; think design and engineering, or biology and art. Interdisciplinary studies create endless learning possibilities. And, once on campus, if your daughter decides design isn’t her thing, she’ll have a wealth of other majors to consider.

Maine College of Art

Maine College of Art

Getting clear about what your teen wants to study, and what type of environment will be best for them will get everyone off to a great start. Begin your family conversations early, and include a visit to each type of campus if you can.

Find more Art.College.Life. news on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Scholarship Season: Tips & Tools

scholarship piggy banks from FastwebThis time of year usually creates a stress shift. Hearts and minds have moved beyond the holiday season and those time-consuming college applications have long been completed and submitted. Senior families are now consumed by “the waiting game;” that time when everyone becomes visibly sensitive to each ping, tweet, and swoosh emitted from cell phones and computers. Did she get in? Is he wait-listed? If you haven’t already done so, it’s a good time to research scholarship opportunities. The cost of higher education isn’t getting cheaper anytime soon, and once admission letters are in hand it might be too late to investigate many opportunities. So, if you haven’t already jumped into this pool, why not dive in now?

The suggestion to research scholarships often results in a deer-in-the-headlights stare from parents and teens alike. Translation: where do I begin? The biggest bang you’ll get will always be from institutions that accept your teen. That being said, there are countless other opportunities to explore. Keep in mind that many deadlines for submission have already passed. And some scholarships might seem small when you consider the overall cost of college. Try not to let this discourage you. Each one can help alleviate the expense of books, art supplies, dorm living, etc. Add multiple wins together and you could be talking some substantial money.

Before you begin a random search, consider a few tips to keep in mind:

Scholastic Art Scholarship  submittal 2014

Scholastic Art Scholarship submittal 2014

Know your resources. The best place to start is with your high school counselors. They can guide you to reputable online sites. Plus, they may be aware of some hidden gems that specifically speak to your search. I’d also reach out to local non-profits and your employer. Both may offer scholarships that you’re unaware of.

Know what you’re searching for. Will he be staying in state? Is she specifically interested in one major? Pay attention to categories that fit your teen. You can search by state, major, religious affiliation, community service, etc.

Read the fine print. Each application has its own unique requirements for submission and awards. Deadlines vary.

Don’t forget college admissions offices. If you’re pretty sure your teen will be accepted at a school – or already has been accepted – you should already be in communication with the admissions office about scholarship opportunities. That’s where you have the chance for the largest financial impact.

Many students feel mentally fatigued from the application process itself. I get that. Spending time searching for scholarships would seem even more draining. And, submitting another unique drawing or essay might feel like a waste of time and energy. I get that too. But your son or daughter won’t have any chance of winning those sought after funds if they don’t even try. That extra effort now may enable a semester for studying abroad or reduce the amount they’ll need to earn over the summer.

Here are a few opportunities to get you started. If you need additional help searching, send me an email and we can work together. I’m at artcollegelife@gmail.com.

Zinngia Art Scholarship (Ohio residents, applicable anywhere)

Two-Ten Footwear Foundation

Ladies Auxiliary VFW

Make sure to catch all the latest Art.College.Life. news on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

scholarship signage

 

O Canada!

canadian flag

This is the second in in a series focusing on financial options and opportunities for art students. 

With the cost of college seemingly forever on the rise, it was no surprise to hear NBC News report recently that the high cost of tuition has many Americans running for the border – the Canadian border.  According to the report a Canadian college education is somewhere between one third and one quarter the cost of a US college education.  Let me repeat that – a Canadian college education runs between one third and one quarter the cost of a US college education.  Those are game changing numbers! 

Canada is home to some outstanding institutions.  According to a 2013 U.S. News & World Report ranking, McGill University and University of Toronto rank in the top 20 higher education institutions in the world.  Other top universities include University of British Columbia (UBC) (45) and McMaster University (152).  Each has a fine arts program.  Degree opportunities include Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Media Arts, Master of Arts, Master of Applied Arts, Master of Design, and Master of Media Arts. 

Canada has its share of excellent art schools as well.  Alberta College of Art & Design, Emily Carr University of Art & Design, Nova Scotia College of Art & Design, and Ontario College of Art & Design are the four I researched.  Given their costs, I’d suggest checking them out.  Here’s a small sampling of comparative costs that I found.

Fee Comparison Canada & U.S.

Please note that the costs I’ve identified for Canadian schools are their International rates, listed in Canadian dollars.  The exchange rate right now is pretty even, eliminating calculation juggling.  Also, these comparisons are for tuition only – the single largest portion of a college education.  Other expenses will include room, board, health insurance and additional fees. 

Other financial aid benefits exist for American students in Canada.  They include applying your 529 college savings account, continued eligibility for U.S. Federal Student Aid programs through many Canadian colleges, and potential international scholarships.  I found the Net Price Calculators – or their equivalent – to be quite handy on a number of sites.  UBC, MassArt, and SAIC have them.

After reading this post your search for finding the right art program may have gotten a bit longer.  However if cost is a key decision factor in where you’ll go to school, and you’re up for an adventure I’d suggest giving Canadian colleges some thorough exploration.  Eh?

Paying For It All

pastels - financial aid 101.indd

With decision day behind us, seniors are breathing a sigh of relief. College plans are made. Woo hoo!! Let the partying begin.

Now it’s time for juniors to begin feeling those uneasy twinges; where will I go? How will I make my decision?  What factors should I include in my decision process?

Clearly, the increasing cost of a higher education needs to play a considerable role in your thought process. The cost of attending college is still on the rise, and the impact is significant for everyone involved. In fact, even the famed Cooper Union has been affected by the rising tide, stating in a press release last week that after more than 100 years the school will begin charging tuition to undergraduates. Add in the fact that accumulated student debt has outpaced credit card debt, and it’s enough to make every college-bound student and family nervous.

Ever an optimist, I do see a glimpse of good news on the horizon. Yesterday’s Huffington Post claimed “Class of 2013’s Starting Salary Tracking Higher On Average Than Last Year’s Grads.” Keep in mind it reads “on average,” but still, the news isn’t all doom and gloom.

So what does this roller coaster of news mean for high school students looking at art schools? Financially speaking here are three things to focus on:

1 – Be smart about your college choices.  There’s where you want to go, and where you can afford to go. They may not be the same place. This may also mean foregoing an arts college and instead choosing to attend a comprehensive liberal arts university. (Read: if you’re not sure you want to make a career out of your artistic passion you’ll find more potential career opportunities at a comprehensive institution.)

2 – Compare the detailed costs.  Make sure you research and understand all the costs associated with each institution. That means tuition, room & board, health insurance, transportation fees, books, art supplies, etc. It’s a long list. And some schools will have a breakdown of different costs associated with different art majors. If that information isn’t readily available, ask for it.

3 – Make time to thoroughly understand financial aid and scholarship opportunities for each school on your list.  This process can be thoroughly confusing, frustrating, time consuming, and daunting. But from personal experience I can tell you it is worth the effort. The Net Price Calculator, made available through College Board, is an excellent tool to help you estimate your eligibility for financial aid options, and it’ll help you compare schools in the process. Current participating art schools include Ringling, CCAD, FIDM, Pacific Northwest College of Art, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, SVA, and Pennsylvania College of Art & Design.

As for scholarships, remember you’ll get the biggest bang for your buck from the college you attend. That doesn’t mean searching for privately funded scholarships isn’t worth the effort; it just means that the latter typically give out smaller allowances, so be realistic about what you can get.

Knowledge is the key. So whether you’re a rising junior or senior – starting your research now is a smart idea.

Next week we’ll continue this discussion.

This is the first of two posts focusing on financial options and opportunities for art students.