What’s On Campus Now

Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University

There is nothing quite like the feel of walking across a college campus, especially in fall. The quintessential image of backpack-laden students strolling along paths between manicured green spaces, with leaves crunching underfoot. It has to be experienced to be believed.

Only by visiting campus can your teen obtain that first-hand understanding of the culture or “feel” of a college. Each one has its own unique vibe comprised of its students, the courses, the professors, the quad, the local town, and even the weather.

College information sessions and tours provide a wealth of information. But keep in mind that they only show off what they want you to see. To know which colleges could be “best fit” opportunities, get off the beaten path. Make time to explore the studio space, talk to some unassuming students, and take in a local exhibit or lecture. All will provide you with a better understanding of campus resources, how available and friendly students and faculty are, and what opportunities exist during and after college.

Every campus has great events and lectures taking place throughout the year. Here’s a sampling of some that caught my eye. Let me know what others you find.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
University of Michigan, Stamps School of Art & Design
University of Florida, College of the Arts
Pratt
UCLA
RISD

Future Design Careers: What You Need To Know Now

I’ve often heard it said that today’s college students are studying and preparing themselves for jobs that don’t exist yet. Could that really be true?

Technology has changed everything.

The folks at Fast Company interviewed a dozen leaders in the design world to get their take on where we’re heading, and what design careers to plan for. No plan is perfect, but 5 Design Jobs That Won’t Exist In The Future clearly identifies some of the changes future designers should expect.

I asked Tom Gattis, Dean of the School of Design at CCAD for his opinion on how design fits into our continually changing landscape. Clearly, it’s a high priority issue for him. “Reflective of what’s happening in the marketplace, [design] disciplines are changing daily,” he explained. The basic technical skill set of the past is today’s minimal requirement to gain entry. “UX and graphic design are morphing together. Product designers and graphic artists all have to have the breadth of knowledge to work across what used to be discreet disciplines.”

In other words, design fields are simultaneously merging and broadening.

Schools across the country are adapting to meet the needs of industry. They’re integrating their creative disciplines, including more social science and research into the curriculum, exposing students to international cultural norms, and incorporating business basics that today’s employers demand. They’re also providing learning opportunities that extend well beyond the studio and classroom. The skills of “collaboration, professionalism, and networking,” are all important interactions that make for better professionals and employees, stated Tom. Employers are looking for an “amalgamation of skills beyond just being creative,” he added.

The bottom line brings good news: the world is waking up to the problem-solving value that designers bring to the table. Creative opportunities lie ahead!


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Waiting Out The Waitlist

It’s April. That means the deadline has come and gone. All results are in. Yeah! Or, perhaps not.

There are only three answers to the college admission question. Two are definitive. One leaves you and your teen hanging. The “yes’s” are invigorating. (They like me; they really like me!) The “no’s” can be crushing. The dreaded waitlist just sits there like a lump in your stomach.

AIGA design archives

AIGA design archives

The Facts
The reality is, more students apply to any individual college than can ever be accepted. Simultaneously, every institution has its own unique goals and priorities. The demographics, artistic ability, majors, GPA, etc. of each incoming freshmen class needs to meet those goals. Taryn Wolf, Director of Undergraduate Admissions at MICA, shared that MICA was on the Common App for the first time this year. Consequently, their application numbers were way up. That’s good for the college and the class as a whole; it just makes the waiting game tougher.

Sadly, choices of who is accepted may sometimes come down to the fact that a college is looking for more illustrators than industrial design majors this year. It’s not personal, although that rarely makes anyone feel any better.

Managing The Wait
So, how do you and your teen master the dreadful waitlist experience with the least amount of stress? It’s a three-step process, with the last one requiring time, dedication, and patience.

stamps logoStart by accepting an offer of admission. Congratulations! You’ve got a kid in college! Make sure to get your deposit in by May 1st, National College Enrollment Deposit Day. Second, I’d encourage your teen to communicate with those schools he won’t be attending. A polite thank you, but no thank you is greatly appreciated (and it may help someone else gain acceptance from that waitlist!)

Then it’s time to get proactive. Staying on a waitlist begins with a response. Karina Moore is the Director of Admissions and Enrollment Management at University of Michigan’s Stamps School of Art & Design (Stamps). She put it clearly, “students must take action and accept the offer in order to be placed on the waitlist.” Then, your teen needs to get busy demonstrating how and why he should be accepted for enrollment.

Knowledge is power. Once he’s on the list get your teen to contact his admissions representative and inquire why he was waitlisted. GPA too low? Dedicated interest not apparent? Listen to the reply and respond accordingly.

Keep Calm waitingColleges welcome and often encourage sending in updates. But please don’t bombard them! Updating a file with solid GPA improvements, a new achievement, a mentor’s recommendations, or new artwork is appropriate. Encourage your daughter to build a website of her new work and send the link. Even better: go visit the school. She should make an appointment with her rep while on campus. Hand delivering that additional work provides an opportunity for greater interaction and a personal pitch of the value she’ll bring to campus. Taryn was encouraging here as well; “the interest and enthusiasm that some students are showing will be meaningful,” when it comes to accepting students off the list.

The waitlist process is different for each college and sometimes each program. Stamps has its own procedure which means your teen isn’t on the same list as those seeking acceptance into other University of Michigan departments. Students waitlisted there are encouraged to email new accomplishments and creative work to stamps-admissions@umich.eduMICA-hopeful students should contact the college for a direct email address.

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Look who’s advocating for the arts?

I know that I promised a post about Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art this week. But, I happened to find inspiration for art.college.life. in two unexpected places, so CMU will need to wait a week. I hope you’ll forgive me.

It’s not every day – ok, it’s rare – to find artistic vision from political columnists or corporate magazines. This past week provided those exceptions.

follow your passion signDavid Brooks is a well-known conservative political and cultural writer for The New York Times with a long-standing resume. In Friday’s newspaper, he wrote about the passion-driven among us, and the benefit they bring to the rest of society. Nice words to hear for those driven to study the arts.

I also stumbled across an article on Forbes.com highlighting the benefits of an art degree. And the strong career opportunities that lay ahead.

Hello? Where am I? Have I fallen into an alternate universe?

human figure2In this day and age when studying math and science, and earning a large salary still dominate conversations for career-focused high school parents, it’s encouraging and refreshing to hear from two business savvy representatives of the value – both now and for the future – of “leaning in” towards the arts.

Skepticism is common among parents of those wanting to study the arts. I get that. To me – these two articles speak to allowing our kids to be who they are, giving them the room to find themselves, and accepting that studying the arts can lead to incredible and challenging future careers. I know that sounds counter to common belief. I hope you’ll read both articles. And let me know what you think.

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Graduation Gifts For The Creative In Your Life

Graduation: It’s finally here! Our kids made it and so did we. Congratulations to all the moms, dads, families, and students who are celebrating this great accomplishment. It’s a time to pause and reflect on the achievement as well as a time to look forward to the next step, whatever it may be.

With college decisions made and grad parties ahead, the next hurdle focuses on what gifts to buy for those accomplished students. Unfortunately, graduation gifts can often become a cause for consternation. What will be useful and fun to receive? Is cash the best gift, or is that too impersonal?

If you haven’t already seen it, make sure you check out this post that helps take a lot of the guesswork out of your searching. It’s not specific to artists and designers, so I’ve added a few of my own for the creative kid. Either way you can’t go wrong. And once again, Congratulations!

Blicks: The go-to art supply resource. Whether the need is brushes, sculpting tools, wood glues, or drawing tables, a gift from Blick’s can’t go wrong.

Photography Equipment: Having great photographs is key for every artist. The tools needed to get there can be expensive. Cameras or gift certificates from a local photography store can get your artist on the right path to documenting their creativity for sale or documentation.

Art Classes? Just because a portfolio was completed for college applications doesn’t mean it’s done. It’ll never be done. A gift card for a summer art class will keep the juices flowing and may introduce your grad to a new medium never tried before. What a great head start before the college school year begins.

Art in the City: Each city has its own wonderfully unique artistic features. Why not treat your teen with a tailor-made adventure in his new college town? A gift membership to the art museum or an architectural tour are two creative ways to explore a new neighborhood. Tickets to the local theatre, musical, and dance performances are just as engaging and enjoyable.

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