A Day in the Life: Art at a University

OSU Welcome WeekAudrey Quinn Galat is a junior currently majoring in Painting and Drawing at The Ohio State University (OSU). I interviewed her for Art.College.Life’s A Day in the Life series to give you a peek inside a large university. Here are her insights:

I personally think attending a school with a large variety of majors is a must, especially if you are an art major. If you are taught in an art school and the environment is just art and art related things how are you supposed to function in the “real world” where there is obviously a lot more then art surrounding you? Attending a well-rounded school like OSU lets you see perspectives of other “non-art” people, giving you fresh ideas for your work, and allowing you to better understand what your future employers will want from you. Many engineers attend OSU. Art students end up incorporating engineering into their art to make it more unique and more interesting. Also, many future artist employers will be non-artists. One story that comes to mind is of a photography major who was also very interested in skateboarding. He started working for a skateboard magazine just editing a few stories and eventually started taking photos for the magazine. He now makes more than his professors. His job was non-art related, but he was able to turn it into his major. I’d advise young artists to take their passion for art and their passion for whatever else, and combine them if you are able. Being in a diverse school opens up tons of job opportunities to the “real world” where you can add your own artistic twist.

Audrey Galat - OSU student 10.14.15 copyAs you know I love your wire motorcycle goggles. Was that for a class?
The motorcycle goggles were for my sculpture class. We had to draw in space with wire. Don’t always think of drawing like that, do you?

Can you describe a typical day?
– Wake up at 6:30am, get ready for classes; take the bus to Hopkins (the art building)
– Drawing class 8–11am
(eat a granola bar to hold off my stomach because I can’t eat lunch until 2:30pm)

– Anthropology class and English class 11:30am–2:05pm
– Take the bus home to eat lunch (don’t have money to eat out all the time)
– Work 4–8pm
– Eat dinner at 8pm
– Hang out with friends or do homework
– SLEEP!
– Wake up at 6:30am again and repeat!
Weekends are for catching up on school, hanging out with friends, and for relaxing.

Tell us about one of your favorite classes, and why it’s your favorite?
My favorite classes right now are my painting II class and my sculpture class. My painting class is fairly fast-paced has about 20 students in it. Sometimes we work on two paintings at once!

My sculpture class is just as fast paced; it also has about 20 students in it, which is a ton for a sculpture class. It can be a little challenging because sometimes we have to share power tools. I like to show up to class early and selfishly claim the best tools for myself. Part of what is so great about this class is that I learn how to use so many different tools in different ways. Right now I’m teaching myself how to carve into a tree truck with a chainsaw, it’s pretty cool!

painting studioMany people (including some parents) think that majoring in art is easy, with few demands on your time and abilities. How’d you like to dispel that misconception?
It is interesting how often people will say being an art major is “easy” – but then they take a studio class and they hate it because it’s “too much” work. With that being said an art major will take about three and sometimes a crazy four studio classes plus about two general education classes per semester. Each studio class is about three hours long, twice a week (sometimes three times a week) and you are expected to work at least an additional nine hours each week outside of class for each class. Being an art major might not be “hard” mentally, but it will be time-consuming. You can avoid all-nighters and rushing if you just use time management. I promise it’s not as scary as it sounds. Because you are doing what you love and are passionate about art, time seems to fly by. And, because art is already what you do in your free time it isn’t a chore to work on homework.

Are you involved in any on- or off-campus non-class activities?
I am involved in a church small group that meets once a week. Other than that I don’t have much time for anything else. However, I think it’s great to be involved in groups other than art! Adds culture and character to your work!

What’s your favorite place to eat off campus?
My favorite place is Fabians Deep Dish Pizza. I love pizza and this is literally the BEST pizza I have ever had. My mouth is watering just thinking about it!

Clearly you’ve thought about life after graduation. So what are you thinking, career-wise? You told me “being an art major is already a daring move.” I love that because it’s true yet your passion for it still comes through loud and clear. Have you considered an internship to help you “try out” one or two paths?
As of right now I am open to internships, but am unsure where to apply. I think internships are a great way to get involved with the “real world” and they would defiantly help with job opportunities.

Want to learn more about what Audrey’s up to? Make sure to check out her website and facebook pages. You can always find more up-to-date tips and information on our facebook and twitter pages.

 

Guest Post: Pratt & Fashion Design

It’s fashion show season at art and design colleges across the country. So what’s it like on the inside? I asked Pratt junior Landry Low to give us her perspective.

DSC_0063 -a close upOne of the biggest benefits to going to school in Brooklyn is the fact that I am in one of the major creative hubs, not just in the United States, but also around the world. We have everything at our fingertips – between our close proximity to the other four boroughs and what is available in our own backyard.

I live on the first floor of a brownstone apartment, a short 15-minute walk down the street from Pratt Institute. My roommate, originally from Barbados, is a communications design major (focusing on graphic design). We walk to school together most days, always commenting on how lucky we are to be in such a beautiful neighborhood with a diverse community, rich with culture. Our campus itself is a sort of oasis in the city – complete with expansive lawns, scattered with a constantly changing collection of sculptures. As an Arizona native, I have a special appreciation for the nature on our campus (as most of the nature I’m used to only comes in shades of brown). Whether its tulips and cherry blossom trees in the spring or the colorful foliage of the changing leaves in the fall, our campus is a showcase for the natural beauty that the East Coast has to offer.

I usually try to get to campus a bit early to eat breakfast on the lawn with my friends and cats (we have 16 cats393634_4324009334870_272715025_n -a that live on campus!). Most of my classes start at 9:30 and each meets once a week for a three-, four-, or six-hour time block (with a lunch break splitting up the 6 hour classes). I typically stack my days so that I have two-to-three classes a day, which opens up the rest of my schedule for work. Through work-study I work as a campus tour guide in admissions and as a shop technician in the metal shop.

My favorite day of the week is Tuesday, as that is when I take my six-hour Shape & Form class (a construction based class that is taught in conjunction with our design class). Every other week during spring semester, our department brings in professional fit models for us to fit looks on from our junior thesis collection. This is in 1000896_10201399309767694_1501697596_n -apreparation for senior year, when we’ll spend both semesters developing, creating, fitting, and presenting a final thesis collection. Our entire class is involved in the process – we take photos, videos, and notes for each other, allowing us all to participate, collaborate, and communicate our ideas not just visually, but verbally as well.

As a junior Fashion Design major, I take a four-hour design studio class (Fashion Design), a six-hour construction class (Shape & Form), as well as another four-hour design class (this semester it’s Cut & Sew Knitwear). DSC_0715 - aAfter that, I am free to apply my remaining credits to two liberals arts classes of my choosing, still leaving room for another elective which I can take from any department in the school. I have taken classes in all different areas including Metal Fabrication, Welding & Forge, Intro to Electronics, Woodworking, Perception and Creativity, and Astronomy. One of the best parts about going to a school like Pratt is that I have the opportunity to learn a variety of skills that allow me to create complex cross-disciplinary work. Not only does my own work improve through the implementation of various skills, but I also find that my work has grown dramatically through the collaborative work that I have done with students in other majors as well as in my abroad studies.

Drop me a line if you’re interested in posting about your favorite college art program.
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A Day in the Life: Fashion Design

Want to catch a glimpse of what art school is truly like, from the inside?  Check out “A Day in the Life,” a current art student’s perspective.  First up: Marsha, a Fashion Design major at MassArt in Boston.  When you’re finished reading I hope you’ll hop onto her blog site to see what she’s up to, and give her a “thanks for sharing.”  I also hope you’ll leave a comment to let me know what you’d like to hear next at artcollegelife.com.

A tree grows at MassArt (c) ElainePelz

A tree grows at MassArt (c) ElainePelz

This is my spring semester, sophomore year in the Fashion Design department.  I’m currently taking six classes; Pattern Drafting 2, Creative Fashion 1, History of Photo, Literary Traditions, Fashion Illustration 2, and Web Design.  I should only have five.  If it’s too much work I’ll drop Web design.  This semester my favorite required class is Creative Fashion 1. Our first assignment is the famous non-textile dress. We can choose anything we want to make this dress out of; I chose computer chips and cords. This class is considered a studio class and is 5 hours long. Usually in the beginning we go over what we are doing and watch a demo and then just work on our assignments. Our classes are really small, always under 20 people, so we get one-on-one help. After this class everyone is always coming out of it covered in glue, and staples stuck to everything. It’s just such a fun atmosphere and assignment.

The biggest thing I love about MassArt is being in such a nice city, being able to get anywhere by T and being able to walk to work.  I’m saving up money because I got accepted to Paris Fashion Institute(!) where I’ll go in this summer.

One thing I want to clear up is about the stereotype of “Art School.”  The work load is CRAZY.  Anyone going into art school thinking “oh this will be easy,” is totally wrong.  Go home.  I do more work than any of my friends that go to BU and Northeastern.  Our homework is not necessarily difficult, but it is time consuming.  Any given weekly assignments in any class could literally take you 10+ hours of work.  Because craftsmanship is always supposed to be at its highest standards most of the time if you mess up, you start over.  On top of studio classes all BFA degree students have to take all of the same standard academic classes as any other college kids.  But with this work load everyone coming out of the Fashion Department is an expert at what they do and prepared for any amount of work thrown at them.

And even though this all probably sounds terrible, I wouldn’t choose anything else because I love having my entire life being filled with what I love.  My 10+ hours on one assignment takes up my free time with sewing, drawing, and researching designers.  I’d be doing all that anyway because I love it.  In the short time I have been at MassArt I have realized how dedicated and passionate everyone is about what they do.  The people are all so different, fascinating, and random, which makes MassArt such a great place to learn from one another and to really express yourself.